Day 36

I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life

from the Lent 2016 reading plan


John 13:31-14:7, Acts 17:22-31, Psalm 1:1-6

BY Missy Fuller

Text: John 13:31-14:7, Acts 17:22-31, Psalm 1:1-6

This is part of a 10-day series on the person of Christ in the 2016 Lent study.

I’m notorious for going the wrong way on one-way streets—usually when I’m trying to find free parking. It’s as if finding a close, free place to park trumps all other rules of the road. I do whatever I can to find that perfect spot, fully ignoring the large “One Way” and “Wrong Way” street signs meant to caution me. It seems that when free parking is at stake, the rules fly out my car window. I intend to get there my way, regardless of the consequences.

I hate to admit it, but far too often I have the same attitude in my spiritual life, believing my way is best. But Scripture tells us Jesus is the only way to the Father. Chasing after our salvation in any way apart from Christ, is the wrong way.

“I am the way and the truth and the life.
No one comes to the Father except through me.”
-John 14:6

The Bible couldn’t say it any plainer, but I’m still prone to try and negotiate my own salvation.

I put my hope in all kinds of things to save me, believing they’ll somehow grant me abundant life. And when the Lord graciously steps in to remind me that He is the only way to salvation, I can become fearful. How can it really be so simple? Surely there’s something more.

Yes, I believe Christ is the only way, but then I turn around and start doing all these things to help ‘seal the deal’ of eternity for me. I want to fully surrender to Jesus, because deep down I know that only He can save. But far too often I live like I believe otherwise—as if I could add to His perfect sacrifice!

Like trying to find the ultimate parking spot, I try to find my own way to salvation. I’m afraid that if I follow Jesus with all my heart and all my soul and all my mind (Matthew 22:37)—instead of following myself—I might miss something.

I think Peter and Thomas had similar fears. At the Last Supper, both disciples had questions as Jesus explained He is the only way to the Father. Peter didn’t understand why he couldn’t go with Jesus right then and there (John 13:36). He thought he’d miss salvation if it didn’t happen on his timeline. Thomas didn’t have all the information he thought he needed to follow Jesus (John 14:5). He wanted to walk by sight instead of faith.

In Acts 17, we read about the “extremely religious” people of Athens, who worshiped no shortage of idols and false gods. They worshiped countless things, yet were ignorant of what they were actually worshiping. They even had an altar for an “unknown god”just in case they missed paying homage to something that could save (Acts 17:22-31).

I have more in common with the people of Athens than I’d like to believe. I’m ignorant of the of all the idols I worship.

My appearance.
My reputation.
My success.
My accomplishments.
My relationships…

The list goes on and on, but the result is still the same: none of these idols can save.

Only Jesus. What a sweet relief!

Jesus is the only way. He’s our only hope! When we try to navigate our own way to salvation, we become confused. Like Peter and Thomas, we worry we’ve missed something. Like the people of Athens, we become distracted by the countless gods we worship.

But the truth is this: when we have Jesus, we have all we’ll ever need.

Thanks be to God that Jesus is the only way to Him, to truth, and to life. May we learn to stand firm in this Truth, clinging only to Him for life (Psalm 1:1-6).

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Post Comments (57)

57 thoughts on "I am the Way, the Truth, and the Life"

  1. Emily says:

    This reading really hit home for me. I can relate to a lot of emotions and feelings the author writes. It’s good to know and hear “But the truth is this: when we have Jesus, we have all we’ll ever need”

  2. Ashley says:

    “I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.” -John 14:6

    The Bible couldn’t say it any plainer, but I’m still prone to try and negotiate my own salvation. Sometimes, I feel as though if I don’t take control, things aren’t going to change, and boy is this so far from the truth. This is the way I was raised, and nothing against my parents or my upbringing, because my parents put everything they had into the three of us, but I was taught that we could attain anything as long as we worked hard for it. Sure, that is true in some senses. But in salvation, nothing could be further from the truth. By declaring Christ as our Savior, and Lord of our lives, we are saved. We don’t have to continue to work out way into salvation.

    Like stated above, I think Peter and Thomas had similar fears. At the Last Supper, both disciples had questions as Jesus explained He is the only way to the Father. Peter didn’t understand why he couldn’t go with Jesus right then and there (John 13:36). He thought he’d miss salvation if it didn’t happen on his timeline. Thomas didn’t have all the information he thought he needed to follow Jesus (John 14:5). He wanted to walk by sight instead of faith.

    We’ve all done it before, and I think as we become more mature in Christ, and get to know God’s word better, we believe more naturally. Child-like faith is what I want. You just believe, period, and there is no doubt. However, in early stages (like myself), I find myself flipping through the pages, searching for more distinct answers, and how’s and why’s. There is a distinct answer, I just have to believe it. “I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.” -John 14:6

    When we have Jesus, we have all we will ever need.

  3. Jesus is all we need. He is more than enough.

  4. Caroline A says:

    I often feel as if my idols are such a part of who I have become that I can no longer see them when I look in the mirror-I just see my reflection. The little, or rather disguised, idols are sometimes the hardest to overcome. When we are hurting or in pain from our sin, it’s easy to see the infection and know what needs to be cut out. It’s the small germs of sin that we don’t always see, but are constantly weakening us. This reading is a beautiful reminder that we must constantly wash our hands and our souls of sin through coming to Jesus in humility.

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