1 & 2 Corinthians: Day 35

Weekly Truth

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Today's Text: 2 Corinthians 5:21

Scripture is God-breathed and true. When we memorize it, we carry the gospel with us wherever we go.

This week’s verse is a summary of the gospel of Jesus.

He made the one who did not know sin to be sin for us, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.
—2 Corinthians 5:21

Save the image below as a lock screen for your phone so you can read these words throughout the day.

4-12Corinthians-5

  • Any idea why all the translations put “might” in this verse? It is not in there and it waters down what Christ has already done for us.

    • PamC

      Terry. I think it’s referring to our choice to accept Christ as our Savior. Because we have free will we “might” not accept our salvation. Does that make sense? Or help?

      • Terri

        The qualifier is the “in Him” implying the choice. If you take the might out then it is a true statement. With the might in there it says you may not be the righteousness of God even though you are “in Him”. It would be what you are saying if they said “in Him we can become the righteousness of God”

        • Elle

          Great question Terri! Your question made me go deeper into the verse to the Greek, which lead me to this meaning for “might.” “Might” here in 2 Corinthians 2 is actually one word in the Greek: “might become.” Might become = Ginomai(ghin-om-ahee). The short meaning of this word is, “I come into being, am born.” Ginomai also means: become/became, to emerge, or transitioning from one point to another. In essence, this verse is saying that “in Him” we become or undergo a change of condition, state, or place; a manifestation, if you will. “Might become” is not so much saying that it may or may not happen, but that “in Him” this change is then able to take place. Like you said, Christ is the qualifier. Once we are in Him we “become” aka are being changed into the righteousness of God. It’s a process that takes us from death to life, a foe to a friend, separated to set apart. Hope I could shine some light on the subject and make it a little clear. God bless!

          • PamC

            Thank you so much Elle!

          • Starlight

            Amazing!

          • Terri

            Thank you very much. My understanding of what you wrote is that it should be “can” instead of “might”. In the Greek it is basically just “become” alone from my study also.

    • Hannah

      It is in the Christian Standard version (the She Reads Truth Bible) and the NASB, the NIV… perhaps you just missed it? But I agree with Pam, it indicates that we have the opportunity to become The Righteousness of God. Not that we WILL, because ultimately we have a choice.

    • Claire

      It is even in the KJV. I agree it deals with our choice as we have free will

    • Sarah

      I think of it as “may be able to.” Not as “may or ma not.”

    • Beth S

      It means “can/are able to,” not “might” as in “maybe.” In Him, we can become/ we are able to become the righteousness of God.

    • Sarah J

      I think “might” here works the same way as the word “could.” Sometimes we think of could as —might choose to do that—as in, “We could go to the store,” or we could think of could as referring to ability, as in “He put new tires on the car so we could go to the beach.” I think the “might” here refers to the enabling act of Christ here. He became sin so we could have access to his righteousness.

    • KC Derond

      I believe how they use “might” in this passage could be loosely translated to authorized. We now have a way to be right with God because of Jesus. “…so that we are authorized to be right with God.” We now have permission, we now have approval to do so. We have a Saviour who paid the price so we can be right with God.

  • Churchmouse

    May I never forget who the “he” is : Jesus alone saves. He alone took on my sin. He alone is the Way to righteousness. Only Jesus. Jesus only.

  • Kelly Chataine

    Praise God the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit!

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